The Many Watsons – Bernard Fox

Granger & Fox

I am told by a trusted colleague that he considers this the worst Holmes movie ever made. I respectfully disagree and have previously in this blog given my opinion of the worst Holmes film around. For some reason though, both happen to be made for TV movies of our favorite characters. The Hound of the Baskervilles with Stewart Granger in the role of Holmes was made for TV in 1972 and is not readily available except through some classic movie sites. The problem with the film is not really the actors; in fact, the role of accomplished actors is quite good; the problem is the production quality. It’s as if they had a budget of about $1.95 and decided to see how far they could stretch it. Everything from poorly painted scenery to plastic moor plants were used.

Shatner as Stapleton

As I said, the array of actors was pretty good: Stewart Granger as Holmes, Bernard Fox as Watson, William Shatner (in a non-Star Trek role) as Stapleton, and Anthony Zerbe as Dr. Mortimer. Not a bad cast. The script varies from the original story but is interesting. Granger’s performance is adequate, and Shatner is interesting but his role is somewhat limited. Zerbe is great as an evil Mortimer and Fox does a decent job with the part of Watson. Fox is neither the buffoon nor a rocket scientist and interestingly enough, at the end of the film hints at more stories to come. This was obviously a pilot that suffered from inadequate funding. All in all, I guess it’s worth the 72 minutes of run time just to see another variation on the Hound.

Bernard Fox

Bernard Fox has always been one of my favorite character actors. He was born 11 May 1927 as Bernard Lawson in Wales, a fifth generation actor! He married his wife Jacqueline in 1961 and they have two children. Fox spent some time in the theater but most of his work has been in TV and the movies. He has over 120 credits on the screen and you know his face if not his name. He had recurring roles on Bewitched as Dr. Bombay, the witch doctor and on Hogan’s Heroes as Colonel Crittenden. He appears in numerous TV shows, like: Simon & Simon and  Columbo, as the visiting English police officer and in shows like Man from Uncle 12 O’clock High, Combat, The Andy Griffith Show and F Troop as the British Officer or the comic relief. His last movie was The Mummy in 1999 where he played Captain Winston Havlock the alcoholic RAF pilot. In 1997 he was in a movie about the ship Titanic for the second time. In the 1997 film he played Colonel Gracie but back in 1958 in the classic A Night to Remember he played the part of Lookout Frederick Fleet who has the famous line “Iceberg, dead ahead!”

All in all, Fox has had a great career as a character actor and does a fair job with Watson under poor conditions.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Doyle, Holmes, Watson. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to The Many Watsons – Bernard Fox

  1. IAN BRUCE-DOUGLAS says:

    Was Shatner ever any good in ANY role he played???

    • Kieran says:

      Not a fan are we?

      • IAN BRUCE-DOUGLAS says:

        How can anyone be a “fan” of someone who is so abjectly awful? To be fair, he was a tad more bearable as Fat Shatner in the last “Star Trek” movies…and, the writers were merciful and FINALLY killed him off.

        And, he was mildly amusing at a Trekcon my wife dragged me to.

        I’m just surprised that this man’s immense ego didn’t cause his head to explode.

        And: did you ever hear his gawd-awful rendition of “Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds”?

        I rest my case.

  2. IAN BRUCE-DOUGLAS says:

    As one who has the complete collection of Holmes stories and has read each…lovingly…many times over, I think that Jeremy Brett and Edward Hardwicke were absolutely the BEST Holmes/ Watson team ever. I’m only sorry that Mr. Brett died before the BBC produced the rest of the episodes.

  3. Sarah says:

    Wow, that’s what I was exploring for, what a stuff! existing here at this weblog, thanks admin of this web page.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s